Guest Series 2010

September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

Today I want to introduce you to ina braun, she runs a studio and creative space for teaching and design in Mountain Springs NJ. It is a workspace where fine knitting and crochet patterns, yarns, fiber and fabric are curated.

Today for this guest post I have decided to share the pokey pinwheel blanket once more, when it was first released as a free pattern on ravelry many people assumed it was a doggie blanket … not at all … my patterns are named for dogs I love … and pokey was the perfect candidate for this one. This pinwheel blanket is a repeat of a familiar pattern but with a variety of edgings to give people a one visit sampler.

Pokey’s pinwheel blankie … also known as the grasshopper pie blankie … is a perfect summer-time inspiration in the Spud and Chloë “sweater” yarn for the body of the blankie and “fine” for the trim. The grasshopper pie blankie is reversible and about 32” in diameter. The original version is shown with 10 different trims … 10 slices of grasshopper pie to sample! Take time to read through all of the instructions once before you start. Check that you have all the “ingredients” for a successful grasshopper pie! Pokey thinks his profile shot is his best look!

You need
3 skeins of Spud and Chloë “sweater” in grass and one skein of Spud and Chloë “fine” in popcorn and/or dachshund. There is a good amount left over if you use two colors for the trim. Should be enough to make a baby hat or socks. I’ll be fiddling with that later!!!

US #9 (5.5 mm) double pointed needles, 16” and 24” circular needles of the same size. You might also wish to have a 32” circular needle if you think that there are too many stitches on the needle once you are on the homestretch. It is manageable with the 24” circular!

If you wish to make the crochet trim you will also need an “I” (5.5 mm) crochet hook.

Gauge
The sample has a gauge of 4 sts to the inch … so go ahead and make a gauge swatch in stockinette stitch to know that you will be on track.

Notes:
When joining a new skein you can actually splice the yarn, twist it together again and work carefully over those stitches. Keeps you from having to knot
the ends and weave them away. “Sweater” is a three ply yarn with very soft fibers that will ply together beautifully.

Download the pdf pattern here.

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September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

I am really happy to welcome Jessica Jones from the much loved design blog how about orange, which features DIY tutorials, free printables, and design inspiration from around the web. Jessica is a graphic designer in the Chicago area. In addition to corporate identities and marketing collateral, her work includes a line of fabrics that have appeared on products at Nordstrom and The Land of Nod, as well as in magazines such as Glamour and Family Circle.

Orange craft supply round up

I’m not sure why sunny citrus hues are so pleasing to my eyeballs, but if it comes in orange, I want it! I love to get off the computer and make things by hand, and my stash of crafty goodies contains a healthy dose of tangerine, too. Papers, fabrics, paints, scissors… not to mention my beloved Swingline stapler. For your orangespiration, here are some of my favorite tools and supplies.

Clockwise from top: Craft knife $5.25, cutting mat $22, handmade buttons $7.99, baker’s twine $15, felt tip brush pen $2.25, washi paper $6.00, pencil case $15, masking tape set $24, stapler $21.95, treat bags $7.

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September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

I am really happy to welcome the lovely Maya Donenfeld to Whip Up today. I think I first fell in Love with Maya and her blog when she posted this newspaper bunting heart tutorial. Maya kept me coming back to her blog with her focus on family and natural living and eco crafting.

Jar Caps and Doll Hats

My mother and I were perusing a flea market, when we stumbled upon a basket of gorgeous vintage fabric scraps. Upon closer inspection we realized they were actually the sweetest little doll hats we’d ever seen. I figured someone had once had a very large doll collection, and then my mom pointed to the little sign above the basket: Antique Jar Caps. Hmmm. We still loved our original interpretation, so she gathered a couple to bring back to her nursery school for the doll corner. I took the idea straight to my sewing machine and made a couple of instant hats for my daughter’s friends. Whichever way you look at them: jar caps or doll hats, they are the quickest little project ever and a fun way to use up precious scraps.

  • Fabric scraps
  • Thread
  • Elastic thread or ¼ elastic
  • Scissors
  • Pinking shears
  • rickrack or lace- notions optional
  • measuring tape
  • pencil
  • sewing machine
  • Using pinking shears, cut out a circle that’s several inches larger than the diameter of the jar or little doll’s head. I drew around a soup bowl with a pencil. Make another pencil circle about ½ to 2/4 inches from the edge. I used a mug this time. Add any notions to the outer edge if you want to get fancy.

    Gathering option 1: Cut a strip of ¼ elastic to be the same circumference as the jar/head. Stitch it along the penciled sketch of the smaller circle. Stretch as you go. Done!

    Gathering option 2: Wind elastic thread around your bobbin and insert in machine. Thread needle as usual. Sew around the penciled sketch of the smaller circle. Gently pull gathers as you go so that it’s not too tight. Done!

    Jar caps keep the dust off your canned goods and make them extra festive for gift giving. Doll hats are darling and their speed in whipping up will amaze your child. Don’t for get to leave little slits for ears that might need a little extra room!

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    September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

    Today I am happy to introduce Alisa Burke to Whip Up. You might recognise Alisa from her lantern lights tutorial using paper cups, or her driftwood city or even her altered flip-flops.

    Hi I am Alisa and I am a freelance painter, and mixed media artist, I studied fine art at Portland State University with a major in painting and printmaking. With a background in painting and a desire to explore and push materials, I am always looking for new ways to break the rules and redefine art. It is not uncommon to find me digging through the trash in hopes of finding something unique use in my artwork! My paintings have been exhibited in a variety of galleries and featured in several publications. In addition to making art, I also teach workshops nationwide and have appeared as a guest artist on the DIY Network show Craft Lab and Quilting Arts TV on PBS. I work as a Bernina Artisan and my book Canvas Remix was released spring 2008.

    Monster Lunch Sack Tutorial

    It is time to go back to school and while I don’t have kids, I have plenty of friends with little ones and a husband who acts like a kid! What better way to send your kiddos off with their lunches than in a fun monster lunch sack!

    I stared with two pieces of fabric cut into a rectangle for the front and back. For the front I used a plain piece of canvas and for the back I used a piece of messy canvas painted with fabric paint. Optional – extra fabric to line the lunch sack if you want.

    Next, I cut out simple shapes from fabric scraps to create a monster face on the front of the bag.

    I used a darning foot to sew the shapes to the surface, using messy stitches to create lines, texture and details.

    When the monster face was all sewn down, I sewed the sides and the bottom together with a straight stitch. While the bag was inside out, I folded the corners into triangles and sewed them down with a straight stitch.

    Last, I used sticky back velcro and attached to the top and bottom of the bag.

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    September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

    Today I am very pleased to welcome Ellen Luckett Baker to Whip Up, Ellen is author of the craft and sewing blog, The Long Thread. Her work has been featured in several publications and she is currently working on a sewing book to be published by Chronicle Books in Spring 2011. Ellen lives in Atlanta with her husband and two young daughters.

    Halloween is my favorite holiday, so I’ve made a pincushion pattern for you that can also be used as a Halloween decoration.

    Based on the idea of a tomato pincushion, these could be made into apples or tomatoes, or sewn with patterned fabrics for a patchwork look. The stem is made of floral wire wrapped with embroidery floss. You can make these with the kids and add felt cut-outs to the face to create a jack-o’-lantern. This is also a great project for fabric scraps or felted sweaters. With two different sized templates, you can make a pumpkin patch!

    Download the pattern and instructions here as a pdf.

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