Guest Series 2010

September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

Today I want to welcome Mollie Johanson from the blog Wild Olive. Mollis is a freelance graphic designer by day and maker of things the rest of the times. She often features printables on her blog and through her etsy store. Her design background means she can create cool things like this bacon inspired fabric and this fern design which you can download for free.

I love the changing seasons, and look forward to each one. But autumn… that’s the best one. I could go on about the crunching leaves and the brisk air, but really, it’s all about the pumpkin spice latte. I love ‘em, and I can’t wait until the day when I find out that my favourite coffee store sells them again. The thing about a beverage like this, is that it is the perfect companion for fall crafting. Specifically for me, give me some hooped fabric, embroidery floss, a needle, and a disconcertingly orange latte, and I’m a very happy girl!

And what could be more perfect than to combine these two loves, than an embroidery pattern declaring my love. If you share these feelings or know someone who does, then I welcome you to download the pattern I’ve created, and stitch and sip to your heart’s content.

{ 14 comments }

September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

Today I want to welcome Jennifer Casa to Whip Up. Jennifer is a mama + [home + maker]. She loves to knit and sew and cook and craft with her kiddos and design knitting + sewing patterns and make music with her husband and snap pictures and write about all those things. You might want to read more about Jennifer’s handmade philosophy and how she likes to give back to the community with her handmade talents – there is a pattern too.

As a long time reader of whipup and avid fan of all things handmade, i find myself with a growing list of lovely things i’d like to make, but little to no free time to do so. As a whopper of a deadline approaches, i am giddy with anticipation of a bit more time in my days to make – for making’s sake. Here a few of my favorite things:

I will definitely be making lots and lots of t-shirt yarn (image above) thank to this great tutorial by none other than Stefanie Japel. If you need some guidance on using t-shirt yarn, she also offers online classes incorporating this very stuff.

I adore this ruffle sleeve top by the absolutely lovely candace todd. With autumn quickly approaching, I can see it as a great layering piece for my little girls. (Tutorial link)

Kids of all ages will enjoy making these snowflake decorations by Betz White. Look how how they sparkle! And while we’re at it, how about a few of her fantastically mysterious felt ogee ornaments, as well.

These necklaces by Jessica of happy together are completely adorable. Me thinks they would make great teacher gifts this year. (Tutorial link)

We will continue to be inspired to play with our food thanks to fantastic blogs like Little food junction.

So there you have my list, whipup friends. Now it’s your turn – leave a comment with a link to a favorite tutorial you are looking forward to trying soon. Happy making! xoxo

{ 8 comments }

September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

Today I want to introduce Wendy from Sunshine Creations. Wendy is a crocheter and knitter extraordinaire (she also sews amongst many other creative endeavours). You might know Wendy through some of her expert visual tutorials – my favourites are her crochet yoyo afghan and her paper piecing tutorials – Wendy also has a book on how to crochet yoyos.

Fall is here. Which for me means cold hands while warming up the car in the morning. I have Osteoarthritis so this just kills my hands. Plus I have never liked having cold hands but don’t like gloves hiding the ends of my fingers making it difficult to open things. So fingerless gloves are in order.

Quick and easy fingerless knitted glove pattern
Here is a simple pattern that is warm for the hand and lets you have your fingers free and it still stylish plus you can make it unique as discussed at the end of the pattern. You can hold your tools and keep your hands warm. If you do not knit I have also made a similar pair in crochet on my blog to make both sides of the fiber art community happy.

Here is a way to make mittens with out double pointed needle you knit each needle with the other end of its own circular needle this makes it easier to not have laddering in your work plus it means it is harder to loose a needle.

One size fits most adults
Supplies:

  • 3 circular needle size 1 ( this is easier to do with the shortest circular knitting needles you have but long will work too it just has more stuff (tubing) hanging down.
  • 1 skein Sock yarn size 1 super fine 1.52 oz minimum
  • Pattern:
    Cast on 64 stitch place 32 stitches on 1 circle needle and 32 on the 2nd circular needle

    rounds 1-22 (2 inches): do a 2 x 2 rib that means k2 p2 around all 64 stitches ( If you want this part longer make more rows of ribbing)
    rounds 23-36 (1 1/4 inches): just plain knit around all 64 stitches Make sure last round is tight between stitches 32 and 33
    thumb gusset (3 circular needles)

    round 1: knit 32 on needle one (using new needle) create 2 stitches between needle one and needle two between what was stitch 32 and 33 on previous round ( this is why you wanted them tight or you might get a gap or hole here when done). knit last needle. ( I am assuming you know how to do a left and a right increase and where to do them as this isn’t a tutorial on how to do stitches but a simple pattern that assumes you have prior knowledge) If you do not know there are lots of tutorials on you tube and you can go step by step making fingerless gloves is way easier than making socks.
    round 2: knit plain over all three needles
    round 3: knit plain on needle one increase on needle two then knit the stitches on there plain then increase one more time at the end of needle two, knit needle three
    repeat round 2 and 3 till you have 26 stitches on the thumb gusset needle end with round 2 top of palm area (skipping thumb gusset needle)

    - knit in the round for 12 rounds
    - knit a 2 by 2 rib for 4 rounds
    - cast off loosely or use the stretchy cast off hand finishing thumb

    split the thumb stitches so you have half (13 each) on two separate circular knitting needles add yarn and knit for two rounds (doesn’t matter where you add the yarn inside of thumb or outside but I do like to do it on the inside of the thumbs that way if there is a little gap I can stitch it close for added strength when I finish threads) Just make sure it is neat.

    - knit for two rounds
    - knit in 2 by 2 rib for 4 rounds cast off loosely or do stretchy cast off.
    - finish all tails

    Repeat for second glove these gloves can be worn on both hands there is no front or back to them. This is fine for use with solid or patterned sock yarn. That is if you make the pattern go all the way around the hand other wise make your pattern on first needle on first glove and last needle on last glove.

    How to make the pattern more yours to show off your personality
    Since this is just simple knit stitch you can do two or more colors to make an interesting design.

    Or you can add lace patterns to your 1st needle on first glove and your last needle on the last glove you make. Just make sure you leave at least the first 5 and last 5 stitches in knit stitch on the needle you are doing the lace on are left plain knit stitch so the sides of your mitten are solid also leave the thumb gusset solid knit.

    { 2 comments }

    September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

    Today I want to welcome Cheri from I Am Momma – Hear Me Roar, I love this blog – its organised and creative – featuring lots of boy related crafts, refashioning and tutorials – I love these upcycled boys hats that I featured recently on whipup.

    I’m Cheri from I Am Momma – Hear Me Roar. I’m excited to be here today because thie site rocks! There are always oodles and oodles of great links and ideas. I wanted to share something for the upcoming cooler weather. I love all the gorgeous hand-knit scarflettes and cowls I’ve seen around, but I have one problem. I don’t know how to knit. Yeah, that’s a bummer. It’s on the to do list. 

    I do, however, love to sew and I do have garbage bags full of clothing waiting to be upcycled or refashioned. So today I’m going to show you how to make this scarflette from an old sweater. Here we go!

    I took this long sweater and cut out a long rectangle. (My dimensions were about 8 inches by 29 inches.) I flipped the nice finished sides together and sewed around the edges. I left the bottom end open (the one with the ribbed edge).

    I inverted it and sewed on two large buttons. I didn’t make real buttonholes, since the scarflette can easily be pulled over my head. I also didn’t bother to sew the end shut, since the buttons keep it in place. Super easy, super cute, and super warm.

    Thank you for having me Kathreen! All of you are welcome to drop in and visit my blog anytime. Thanks!

    { 42 comments }

    September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

    Today I want to introduce you to Christine Evans – one crazy motivated woman who has set herself a challenge of learning, or at least trying, 52 different crafts in 52 weeks and she is blogging the experience here. Christine also has her regular craft blog paper cloth where she discusses … more craft!

    When I decided to take on the ambitious challenge of trying a new craft every week for a year I honestly didn’t know if I’d be able to do it – and, 12 weeks in, I still don’t!

    The crafting challenge
    You may ask, why? Well, I wanted to do something that would allow me to just have fun with crafting. I don’t have time to get bogged down in details and complicated instructions – I just pick a craft, do some quick research, gather (or borrow) some supplies and get going. It means I can just experiment and enjoy what I’m doing rather than worrying too much whether I’m getting it right. I guess it’s a bit like when we were kids. Do you remember when you didn’t care if you were holding the paintbrush properly, if you covered the paper with clashing poster paints or what your clay pots looked like when they came out of the kiln? It didn’t matter – it was just fun.

    So far I’ve embraced the messiness of papier mache and porcelain bead making and the fun of freehand machine embroidery and toy-making. I’ve already discovered some new favourites – I’ll be repeating paper piecing and the machine embroidery for sure. Thats me (above) wearing a maxi dress I made from Anna Maria Horner voile, and below there is a picture of a Papier mache bowl I made from shredded office paper.

    I haven’t always been very successful – my first attempts at knitting were pretty disastrous and involved quite a few rude words but I’m now progressing slowly and steadily with my first project and even finding the rhythm of the gentle craft addictive. And I’m enjoying flexing my creative muscle every single week.

    It can certainly be a challenge trying a new craft every week and getting things completed but so far I’ve managed to complete all the projects in the week – the exception being the knitting which was a real challenge! The problem will be where to put everything – I think there are going to be a lot of handmade gifts heading to friends and family this Christmas!

    You may wonder how I can afford to try something new every week – surely I must need to buy new supplies all the time? Well so far I’ve been really lucky in that I’ve been able to reuse and recycle things (like the jumper I used to make the toy rabbit) and I’ve been bowled over with the kindness of my fellow crafters and offers of supplies and help. Although it’s definitely a risk that my already overflowing craft room will be even more packed before the year is out!

    I have loads more fun crafts to try – glassblowing is on the list as are screen printing and weaving – and I can’t wait. My challenge to you is: try something new this week. And maybe next week too. You’ll have fun, I promise!

    { 2 comments }