Guest Editors 2013

During most of 2013, Whipup.net will hosting a monthly mini-series, each month edited by different crafters and designers. Enjoy!

The theme for this month is Make It Local :: with Alexandra Smith of Lola Nova.

Today, Alexandra introduces Nancy Langdon, the designer behind studioTANTRUM/Fledge and author of Sewing Clothes Kids Love: Sewing Patterns and Instructions for Boys’ and Girls’ Outfits.

For you, I have a little downloadable Ebook to construct a fun, summery tunic dress based on macramé.

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I’m pretty sure we’re at the tail end of hipsters being fascinated with all things 70s. All the good 70s things, as few as they were, like Milo Baughman and Curtis Jere, have been done. We’ve even gone through Corningware, muscle cars, black lights and Afros. All that is left is macramé, rotary phones, 8-track cassettes and TAB (not that new-fangled Diet Coke, thank you very much). And my vote is for macramé. I was recently wandering about Retro Row in Long Beach and saw dusty old macramé owls selling for upwards of $70. So, yes, macramé is upon us again. Right on!

The stringy Strigiformes is the official state bird for the year 1973. According to witnesses, the year 1973 was, in fact, a state (of mind...of sorts...in quite a state). The stringy Strigiformes is the official state bird for the year 1973. According to witnesses, the year 1973 was, in fact, a state (of mind…of sorts…in quite a state).

Macramé, the craft of knotting lace, is likely the earliest of the string-based arts, predating knitting, crochet and tatting by millennia. Fiddling and tying up bits of cord in fancy ways did not seem to have geographic or cultural limits, as ancient examples can be found in places as far-flung as Peru, China and Egypt. The earliest example dates to 3500 BC; since some anthropologists argue that civilization is only about 4000 years old, well, that means macramé is old.

Arabs were probably the first regular practitioners, tying up the weft ends of woven textiles in artistic ways. Sailors over the centuries have used macramé in innovative and creative ways, for example, around tool handles, so sharp knives and heavy hammers wouldn’t slip out of wet hands. The craft, brought from the Holy Lands to Western Europe by the wives and servants of crusaders, was fancied in later centuries by Louis XIV and William of Orange’s Queen Mary. Macramé found its most refined form near Genoa, Italy, where punto á gruppo was taught as a skill to poor children during the 19th Century and resembles fine bobbin lace. Be that as it may, macramé is now synonymous with Nixon-era housewives penchant to release small flora from terrestrial bounds with hemp houseplant hammocks. And lest we forget the hippies: Here, a cautionary tale of what happens when twine is combined with 70s era hallucinogenics (some of these items appear in fact be made from psychoactive hemp …)

And if you thought macramé owl wall hangings were bad, say hello to the macramé owl bra! “Macrame Accessories: Patterns and Ideas for Knotting,” Dona Z. Meilach (1972) And if you thought macramé owl wall hangings were bad, say hello to the macramé owl bra! “Macrame Accessories: Patterns and Ideas for Knotting,” Dona Z. Meilach (1972)

 

 

No words. Just no words “Macrame Accessories: Patterns and Ideas for Knotting,” Dona Z. Meilach (1972) No words. Just no words “Macrame Accessories: Patterns and Ideas for Knotting,” Dona Z. Meilach (1972) Wait, one word: MANcramé. Enough said. “Macrame Accessories: Patterns and Ideas for Knotting,” Dona Z. Meilach (1972) Wait, one word: MANcramé. Enough said. “Macrame Accessories: Patterns and Ideas for Knotting,” Dona Z. Meilach (1972)

On the other hand, if we embrace macramé fashionably responsibly, we can evoke that sense of hope for a better world, which is, I think, at the heart of the new hippie style.

Elizabeth and James Elizabeth and James

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Catherine Malandrino Catherine Malandrino Gucci Gucci

I hope my addition to the macramé trend this fits the bill.

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“La Jolla” (lah HOY-ya”) is a simple, super-duper quick DIY dress with a lot of California soul. This straight shift dress with macramé overlay is an easy-living, flip-flops and popsicles kind of summertime piece to wear anywhere, anytime fun is to be had: as a swimsuit cover-up, as a dancing dress to the end of the school year party, or as a flexible, easy-to-throw-in-a-suitcase piece to take on vacation.

Made up in all white, I think La Jolla is pretty enough to wear to a beach wedding. La Jolla is a beautiful coastal town near San Diego. “La Jolla” is a corruption of the Spanish word “joya”, which means “jewel.” I find this to be a gem of a dress, because with a little cutting and polishing, some cruddy old tee shirts or a clump of boring plain knit fabric can really shine. “Jollas” also happens to be a genus of South American jumping spiders. Since this dress has that SoCal spirit, but also sort of has a spider web look to it, I’ve decided to call it “La Jolla”.

This pattern is sized for girls, ages/sizes 5 to 12. The design concept is great for teens and women, however, the knotting has not been calculated over all size sets within the Ebook instructions. La Jolla is available as an Ebook here.

And speaking of making the world a better place, all proceeds from the sale of this Ebook will go to benefit a home-grown, grass-roots effort to help the people of Enwen, a small village of about 1,000 in Cameroon, Africa, to help themselves. The story of Enwen is not a complicated one, but amazing nonetheless. A young man, Tichi, from this village was educated in Germany. Upon returning to his village, even though he had grown up in Enwen, he was taken quite aback by the poverty. And so he and his partner, Katrin, decided to do “something.” That “something” is Nahow, which in the native Pidgin means something like “S’up brah”. Nahow.de has developed many “somethings” and those “somethings” include an adult learning center to teach valuable carpentry and sewing skills, outfitting the village with solar panels, refurbishing the elementary school and sponsoring doctors’ visits. And this at very, very low cost. For about EURO 20 a month, a villager will be given an apprenticeship in carpentry. Like real, super-duper, hard-core, high-quality carpentry as only Germans can. The people at Farbenmix, my partner in all things sewing, have become personally involved with this project, even having gone to the village to teach sewing.

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I’ve kept the price low as makes sense. As you know, PayPal will have their take. The Ebook has over 20 pages of instruction with lots of photos and illustrations. And the basic pattern pieces are there. I’ve translated it into German, too, just in case. It is a PDF file, so, if EURO 4 is a bit steep, maybe you can go halfsies with a friend.

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Enjoy! And thank you for supporting the craft of sewing!

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During most of 2013, Whipup.net will hosting a monthly mini-series, each month edited by different crafters and designers. Enjoy!

Introducing Destri from The Mother Huddle :: The theme for this month is Advice For Starting and Growing a Creative Business :: Stop listening to the advice of those that say it can’t be done, and seek the advice of those who are successfully doing what you want to do.

Destri :: The Mother Huddle

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Davina was quite literally one of my earliest inspirations, and I can’t wait for you to read her advice. I introduced myself to Davina by email a little over four years ago asking for advice with my blog that hadn’t yet launched.  She sent me over 1000 words of sound advice without even knowing who I was.  It’s hard to find people like that these days.  What I love most about Davina is her passion for the family unit, her words always remind me what’s truly important and why I got into this creative business to begin with.  Enjoy!

About Davina and Her Creative Business

Davina Fear is a familyness adventurer. By day she helps moms rediscover that all they want, they already have. By night she builds forts the size of elephants, discovers her superpowers, lives a non-balanced life, and gives her husband 15 minutes every night. Her familyness photo workshop is changing mom’s lives, not just while they are behind the camera, but also in the everyday chaos of mom-hood. She blogs from her yellow house at davinafear.com.

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Best Advice I Have For Those In A Creative Business

The Day I Walked Out Of Cracker Barrel.

Over twelve years ago I went to a support group for parents of twins. When I arrived at the meeting the women were so warm and inviting. I appreciated their willingness to welcome me into their group.

Seated at the Cracker Barrel, surrounded by waffles and french toast, bacon and eggs, I was ready to hear all of the ways to manage having 2 babies in a couple of months. What followed was a steady stream of how difficult the next two years would be… I was going to detest the next two years. It was going to be so hard that I was going to wish for things I had never considered. Life was going to be hard. It wasn’t going to get easier until these two little monsters went to school.

Part way through breakfast I felt defeated before I had even had these babies. By the time the last bit of syrup and bacon had been consumed, I was mad.

I made a decision as I walked determinedly (is that a word?) out to the car: I was going to enjoy having these babies. I was going to make sure I didn’t see it as a torture session someone was putting me through. I was going to love every second. If someone asked me about what is was like having twins, I was going to be helpful, realistic, and hopeful.

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Obviously, every second wasn’t bliss and I had hard days. There were times I would sit in my chair with two babies attached to me feeling worn out, and I would remember that day I walked out of Cracker Barrel. It would make me look at my babies longer, hold them closer, and remind myself that these days would pass too quickly. I would never again get to hold a baby that was only 5 pounds and a baby that was only 6 pounds, at the same time, ever again. I would think to myself, “This is my moment. Don’t miss it.”

Even though this experience doesn’t sound like advice — it changed my life as a mom and as a business person. I realized then that it’s up to me to make choices about how I am going to see my circumstances and what my responsibility is in my own situation. I can make my working experience and business joyful or miserable. I can make my family life full and beautiful or annoying and hard to get through on a daily basis.

The last couple of years have been rough. I’ve moved across the country, started up a new business, had a difficult time getting it off the ground, transitioned to building familyness, and discovered so much more in the process.

The reality is: it’s been a difficult road. The help I offer you: that everything happens in a way that puts you right where you need to be. The hope is: you are destined for something amazing. You’ll see it if you let yourself look past the yuck that you’re in and see the beauty. Everyday isn’t easy but I’m willing to bet that the good days outnumber the bad ones.

Now, years later, I still say that same thing to myself, “This is my moment. Don’t miss it.”

I can relate with this so much, as anyone in the thick of a creative business can I am sure. Thanks so much Davina for sharing! — Destri

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During most of 2013, Whipup.net will hosting a monthly mini-series, each month edited by different crafters and designers. Enjoy!

Introducing Destri from The Mother Huddle :: The theme for this month is Advice For Starting and Growing a Creative Business :: Stop listening to the advice of those that say it can’t be done, and seek the advice of those who are successfully doing what you want to do.

Destri :: The Mother Huddle

I am super excited to introduce you to Lindsay of The Cottage Mama today.  She not only embodies the example of “getting things done” – she makes things happen. I love that, and I am trying to learn from it. She’s so gracious to others in her industry, and is always ready to offer insight where she can. Since she has found great success in the industry I am branching into, I was really keen to hear her advice. It’s perfect for any creative business, enjoy!

About Lindsay and The Cottage Mama

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My name is Lindsay Wilkes and I am the designer behind, The Cottage Mama, a boutique children’s clothing and sewing pattern company, the writer behind the Sewing and DIY blog, The Cottage Home.

When I started my business three years ago, in early 2010, I wasn’t given a whole lot of advice, but I sure have learned a lot along the way. I’m hopeful that some of these tidbits I’ve learned will help you along the way as well.

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The Best Advice I Can Give You

1. Be naïve, it’s ok. I started my business originally selling children’s clothing and as a sewing / DIY blogger. When I started on the scene no one knew who I was. Who was I to think that I could go from nothing to something in three years? In retrospect, I’ve decided you need to be a little naïve to succeed as a creative entrepreneur.

To be honest, no one had ever heard of me, my blog or my business and a normal, rational thinking person might have thought that there was no way I was going to make a splash on the scene without having connections or already being out there. But luckily I am a dreamer and a believer and I have always believed anything is possible. And you should too because it is. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

2. Set small incremental goals and celebrate each success. Success is not going to happen overnight. It’s important to set small, manageable, doable goals to keep you motivated and excited about your business.

When I first started blogging, I had one follower/reader, my mom. I can remember very clearly when I reached 25 readers, 100 readers, 1000 readers, 5000 readers and now 10,000 readers. I celebrated each and every one of those successes because they were a big deal to me. And the same type of things goes for my pattern sales. Don’t sell yourself short by trying to achieve something right off the bat that a person in the same business has already been working on for many years. As cliché as it sounds, just take one step at a time and be proud of each and every milestone you achieve.

3. Define your own personal style. There are many different designers that I admire and look up to for inspiration, but I feel it’s very important to find your own signature style that is uniquely you. You may not know what that style is right off the bat, but the more you create, the more you will discover what you like and don’t like and will ultimately start to define what makes you, uniquely you.

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4. Find a mentor. When I first made the decision to transition my business from ready-made clothing into my current paper sewing pattern business, I wasn’t quite sure where to start. Luckily I came across someone who had already established their pattern business and was happy to help me get the connections I needed to start me off on the right foot. If you find a mentor that helps you along the way, make sure you pay it forward and do the same for others that are trying to enter your same field of business. You will achieve more success in your business if you help support fellow colleagues rather than viewing them as competition.

5. Don’t compare yourself to others. As hard as it may be, try to stay focused on your goals and don’t let comparison squash your dreams. It is very easy to get caught up in watching someone else’s success and it make you feel like yours will never be possible. Don’t let yourself do that. What makes your business unique is you and that is something very special.

6. And finally, I do not believe success is luck driven. Creative individuals who are successful make it because they work very hard. Yes, the timing can be right for certain opportunities that help things fall into place, but first and foremost, you must be prepared to work. Once success begins to happen for you (and how you measure that is completely up to you), you will see a snowball effect start to happen that will lead to new and greater opportunities!

Thanks so much to Lindsay for taking the time to share her advice with us today. She has a few big things in the works right now, so be sure to keep an eye out on her blog and shop.

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During most of 2013, Whipup.net will hosting a monthly mini-series, each month edited by different crafters and designers. Enjoy!

Introducing Destri from The Mother Huddle :: The theme for this month is Advice For Starting and Growing a Creative Business :: Stop listening to the advice of those that say it can’t be done, and seek the advice of those who are successfully doing what you want to do.

Destri :: The Mother Huddle

Tools For The Creative Business

If there is one list I would have loved to have when starting my creative business, it would have been a list of all the available tools for growing and sustaining it.

I have a few favorites I will share today, but really I can’t wait to hear yours. It seems every time I am talking with fellow creative business owners, they mention a tool I have never heard of.

Some of these you may have heard of, but I am hoping a few make you say “where have you been all my life?” like they did for me when I discovered them.

Tools I Use For My Creative Business

WordPress.org – I include this because it seems that is the most common question I get… Blogger or WordPress? You (or your developer) can literally do anything you need on the platform, you have much more freedom, and from what I understand SEO capabilities are much stronger on WordPress.

WP Engine – This is the company I use for hosting, and I couldn’t recommend them more. I was with Bluehost to start and liked their service as well, but TMH outgrew their servers and we had to find a new home :). WP Engine has all sorts of great features, but here are my favorite – one click backup and restore, they update your site with new wordpress releases, they guarantee you won’t get hacked, and will fix it for free if you do, speed-speed-speedy, always ready to help.

Madmimi – I use this for the TMH newsletter, and love them. You can easily make a beautiful template that is custom to your brand, simple opt-in integration, and great support. I have not experimented with other email platforms, so I would love to hear your input on your favorite.

Kind Over Matter Printables Kit – this is a great ebook with templates for making printables you can use for giving to readers or making for sale.

The Ink Nest – Beautiful graphics you can use for free or for sale printables — just read the terms of service for details.

Outright – I just recently discovered this small business online accounting tool, and I am in heaven. You can link it to paypal, bank accounts, and it keeps track of all the purchases and incoming sales. You can even prepare your quarterly taxes on the site. Like I said, I am new to it, so I am sure there are many other things it can do.

Law For Creatives – Contracts, employment law, insurance, intellectual property, for your specific creative field.

Picmonkey – Oh the things you can do on Picmonkey. I use this platform for all my photo editing — I have photoshop but find it too cumbersome and much prefer the simple and intuitive layout on Picmonkey. Check out their blog for tutorials — love the one for making a transparent background for png files (perfect for logos and watermarks).

Etsy – You can find branding kits to set you apart, graphics for your Facebook page, royalty free graphics, and much more — just do a quick search.

With Etiquette – Royalty free music for videos — I was actually just introduced to this last night!

Alt Classes – Great online classes covering many useful topics. They are always offering different ones, so you just have to check in now and then to see what they have. I have taken tax classes, imovie for bloggers, and many more. What I love is the classes are taught by fellow creatives that know the business, and they’re only $15!

Passionfruit Ads - easiest way I have found to serve private ads, so many great features.

Okay, now it’s your turn! What tools do you use for your creative business? What online platforms make your work easier? Even if you think it is something everyone knows about please share — it may be known in your niche but not in another.

Thanks so much for sharing!

Destri

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During most of 2013, Whipup.net will hosting a monthly mini-series, each month edited by different crafters and designers. Enjoy!

Introducing Destri from The Mother Huddle :: The theme for this month is Advice For Starting and Growing a Creative Business :: Stop listening to the advice of those that say it can’t be done, and seek the advice of those who are successfully doing what you want to do.

Destri :: The Mother Huddle

I have a special treat in store for you with today’s guest. AmberLee owns Ticket Kitchen Chocolate and is the founding editor of Giver’s Log. She is quite possibly the nicest person I have never met — but hope to. She is always generous in sharing her knowledge, and the perfect example that if you’re nice to people and work hard, you can’t fail.
AmberLee bio

About AmberLee and Her Creative Businesses 

I am AmberLee Fawson, mom of three plus one on the way (this will be my second time having a summer baby! bring it on). I live in a little country house in northern Cali and love it. I am also a chocolate maker and make gourmet Hot Chocolate on a Stick and other chocolate goodies, which you can find at my shop, Ticket Chocolate. I am a huge chocolate fanatic, in fact, I consider a good cup of hot chocolate to be a side dish, and nothing makes me happier at lunch time than a big bowl of greens with some Trader Joes croutons and a cup of Bolivian bittersweet hot chocolate on the side. And finally, when I have a free moment I like to read, cook, go on unhurried walks with my kids, or blog about my favorite projects and recipes at Giverslog.
AmberLee in warehouse

Best Advice I’ve Been Given

For me, when it comes to my blog and my shop, there are two kinds of advice.

The first kind of advice is just good business advice. I am always amazed at how much I have to learn, how much I am always learning in my third year of business and fifth year of blogging now, and I always appreciate a few words of solid wisdom.

I think the best advice I ever heard was from a podcast (Stanford’s business school offers the podcasts). One of the speakers said something like this: If you have an idea, don’t wait for it to be perfect before you launch it. Don’t tweak it and polish and perfect it before you offer it to your fans and customers, because who knows, your customers might want something a little different anyway. Just put something out there, a product, a blog post. Your early adopters or first readers will be your best friends and really help you hone in on what you do best.

The second kind of advice might be the advice I appreciate most. It is the advice from other busy moms about how to balance, how to make it all pay off and be worthwhile. There is really nothing like making deicisons of what pressures to put on yourself, of what to say to and what to say no to when you are a mom.

One of my favorite pieces of advice came from a friend, who is a mom of seven now and who runs her own business from home. She taught me that life is tricky when you are a competent person. When you’re competent, you know how well you could play every part in your life. Your pantry could be organized, your dinners could be delicious and interesting, you could be the world’s best room mom for your child’s classroom, you could show up with warm chicken noodle soup at the door step of anyone who needs it. But as you are picturing all this, you neglect to notice that all those things take not only competence, but hours. Lots and lots of hours. So it’s okay to let your standards drop a little in some areas, in fact, it’s often the only way to get your most meaningful work done.

A big thank you to AmberLee for stopping in to share her wisdom today. I told her that last bit could have been written just for me… well the first too!

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