Craft, Creative Ideas and Projects For Kids

Ideas, tutorials and DIY projects to inspire children. Banish boredom and get your kids creating and making.
Weekend and holiday projects for kids and the young at heart.
Kids love handcraft, making and creating and if given the chance will choose real activities over TV and computer games!
For even more creative ideas and activities head over to Action Pack

Recently I’ve started working with little children after a long time out of the classroom. It is exhilarating and exciting and exhausting and so much fun. I want to work with the children to make finger puppets, we are going to design puppets based on the children’s drawings.  Wish us luck!

In the mean time, here are a collection of links to tutorials and patterns for some finger puppets I love very much.

paperkittens

Paper Kittens by Laura at Cupcakes for Clara, published in Mindful Parenting Magazine

gnomefingerpuppets

Gnome finger puppets by While wearing heels

fingerpuppets

No sew finger puppets by Crafty Gemini

alienmonsterfingerpuppets

Alien Monster Finger Puppets by Whispered Whimsy (pattern on Ravelry)

sotosoftiesfingerpuppets

Finger puppet tutorial by Maritza at Soto Softies

Which ones are your favourite? Have you made any finger puppets that you’d like to share with us? Comment below or send us an email at vagusvenus [at] gmail [dot] com.

:::

If you have an idea for a post, or would like to submit a tutorial for Whipup, email vagusvenus [at] gmail [dot] com

{ 1 comment }

For more kids craft, creative ideas and activities go to the Action Pack website

2013 Elements: WATER edition

Cover image: Jo Newman  and her children make natural watercolour paint

The first issue for 2013 is part of our Elements themed year, and begins with WATER. So versatile and so necessary for life. In this issue we have 15 contributors, and more than 20 projects, these wonderful contributors from around the world walk us through arts and crafts, science, experimentation, adventure, cooking and play — all related to water.

  1. :: Jo Newman  and her children make natural watercolour paints & salt from the sea
  2. :: Susan Schwake & her students show us some water colour techniques
  3. :: Vicki Smith makes paper mache bowls with her students
  4. :: Joanie Gorman and a bunch of kids make a fleet of boats & cork sailors
  5. :: Marcie Cuff and her daughter send a message in a bottle
  6. :: Kathreen Ricketson & family [that’s me] investigate ocean flotsam & jetsam, make some ephemeral beach collections & experiment with sea jellies
  7. :: Gina Vida and her children make two ice projects
  8. :: Helen Bird shows us a fun wet felted project
  9. :: Natalie Kramer  experiments with water tension four different ways
  10. :: Jo Ebisujima and her son experiment with water density & quiz us on water usage
  11. :: Alex Kelly and her kids go fishing & learn a lot about fish while using a Japanese printing technique
  12. :: Melissa Wastney bakes water crackers
  13. :: Lucy Hordern and her daughter create a water bottle rainbow
  14. :: Dawn & Wesley Smith make a water rocket
  15. :: and Jackie Boucher has designed a water themed word search & colouring page
This is an e-magazine – you will receive a download link to a high quality printable pdf [you can save the file to your hard drive and access it, read, and print it anytime and you can view the pdf on a Tablet or iPad].
Image: Joanie Gorman‘s cork sailors and pirates

FREE PROJECT EXCERPT

Make these cork sailors and pirates to sail on your boat (project also included in this Action Pack) – DOWNLOAD 1-page PDF here.

Image: Natalie Kramer  experiments with water tension

Image: Helen Bird shows us a fun wet felted project

Image: Gina Vida‘s ice lantern

Image: Lucy Hordern‘s water bottle rainbow 

When tackling these projects be sure to:

  1. Ask permission first.
  2. Organise your area, use equipment safely and follow the safety advice.
  3. Prepare and organise your space, ingredients and materials beforehand.
  4. Be safe and careful when handling heat and knives and sharp instruments.
  5. Clean up afterwards.
  6. Have fun.

Important: After purchase you will be directed to a page where you can download the PDF. And the pdf magazine will also be automatically delivered via e-mail as soon as your payment is received. The e-mail you receive will include a link to download the file directly to your computer. Please note that the link will only allow you to access the file for a limited period (150 hours or 5 tries), so please make sure to download and save the file on your own computer as soon as you receive it. Lost files may be replaced for a period of 30 days following purchase. Very occasionally your email provider may mark this email as junk, so if you do not receive the email, then first check your junk mail, as a precaution download the file from the webpage directly after purchase.

Purchase in the shop

{ 2 comments }

For more kids craft, creative ideas and activities go to the Action Pack website

Book: Side by Side

by kath_red on December 10, 2012

in Books, Kids Crafts

Side by Side: 20 Collaborative Projects for Crafting with Your Kids by Tsia Carson

Tsia Carson is the force behind SuperNaturale.com – an old fave crafty website — and her previous book, Craftivity: 40 Projects for the DIY Lifestyle (2006) was one of the first craft books I ever reviewed here on whipup — so I am pretty excited to tell you about her latest offering — a really gorgeous book full of unique projects for crafty collaboration with your kids.

The three sections of this book are really interestingly grouped -

The first chapter is ‘Collaborations’, projects where you and your kid, or groups of kids, make something as a group, everyone participates and feel ownership of the project.

The second chapter is ‘Companions’, pairs of projects that the both of you (child and adult) can happily do side by side, each with their own project but using the same resources, making a mess together and helping each other when needed, but each project is separate and fairly open ended and easily achieved by each person.

The last chapter ‘Family field trips’ is absolutely delightful. Projects that are for outside and for groups or families to do together. Not requiring special skills, just enthusiasm and lots of hands.

I really like this book. It is quite different from a lot of craft books for kids and parents, I like the collaborative projects and I love the unique perspective. I am very happy to see Tsia back in the world of books.

{ 1 comment }

For more kids craft, creative ideas and activities go to the Action Pack website

I am very happy to be participating in the Imagine Childhood blog tour. For my stop on the tour I asked Sarah a few questions about her philosophy and the book:

Imagine Childhood: Exploring the World through Nature, Imagination, and Play – 25 Projects that spark curiosity and adventure by Sarah Olmsted. Roost Books; (October 16, 2012).

1. You discuss in your book the magic of childhood — Can you explain a little about how you ‘build’ your world of wonder? How you create that magical world for children and how the children you know respond to that world?

I don’t think it is so much about “building” a world of wonder as it is about opening yourself up to the one that we are already living in. Experiencing magic can be as simple as a subtle shift in your perspective or actions. Taking the time to notice the birds in your neighborhood, the intricate patterns of a spider web, the clouds in the sky, can instantly create a sense of wonder wherever you are. The same principles are true in regards to creating a magical world for children. The space that children naturally inhabit is an enchanted one. Every object or interaction has as much potential to be magical as mundane. All that is needed to put the focus on the fantastic is a willingness to jump into that world with them, to chase fairies through the park, to look for magic stones at the beach… to see the world through a child’s eyes and join them on their journey.

Perhaps one of the most heartening aspects of writing this book was seeing just how close children (and adults for that matter) keep the world of magic and how quickly and wholeheartedly they will engage with it. I have worked with, or designed for, children for the better part of my life, but still, the power of a few sticks, some string, and a healthy dose of imagination never ceases to amaze me. When given the space to explore the universe of their imagination, children engage the world with openness and see it for all of its limitless potential.

2. The projects in your book are built upon layers of experimentation and innovation, each project is a guide with lots of tangents of possibility, can you tell us about this trial and error approach to your projects for children?

“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I may remember. Involve me and I learn”
~ Benjamin Franklin

The trial and error framework for many of the projects in this book is based on a sentiment very similar to the quote above.  That in order to really learn something,  you have to engage with it, and nothing is more engaging than experimentation. The fluid structure of experimentation allows children to experience moments of discovery in whatever they happen to be working with and it encourages them to follow those discoveries wherever they may lead. This sort of open ended approach can be fun because it allows children to come back to projects or activities again and again without ever repeating the same experience. Since the focus is on the process rather than the end result, innovations and tangential explorations can be just as important and fruitful as the original activity.


3. You use a lot of natural materials in your projects — and if you are not directly using them then you are inspired by them. Can you tell us how this connection with nature is important for your inspiration and for children’s play?

When you really look into it, most of the materials that we use on a daily basis have a root in the natural world. Whether it is a pigment made from plants or minerals, or a steel cable inspired by the strength found in spider silk, the origin of nearly everything we touch can be connected with nature in some way. I think I am attracted to natural materials for exactly this reason. They are the building blocks of the world we live in, from mountains to skyscrapers, color wheels to computers.

My emphasis on using simple natural materials with children follows a similar logic. That by starting out with the fundamentals children can learn how to build the world of their dreams, one stick raft, one tree fort at a time. Also, procuring natural material means engaging with nature, which is never a bad thing in my opinion.

Thank you Kathreen for sharing your wonderful space with me today!

{ 1 comment }

For more kids craft, creative ideas and activities go to the Action Pack website

NEW edition of Action Pack Magazine – for EVERYONE!

Family Apothecary – 50+ pages of salves, lotions, balms and crafty projects!

This is an e-magazine – you will receive a download link to a high quality printable pdf [you can save the file to your hard drive and access it, read, and print it anytime and you can view the pdf on a Tablet or iPad].

This issue is pretty amazing – if I do say so myself :) My family and I have had such a lot of fun experimenting and trying out recipes and new (to us) ingredients. I have really enjoyed the process of removing a lot of chemical products from our lives – toothpaste and deodorants for starters (something I have been wanting to do for a long time), and I have loved the smells of herbs and essences pervading the home.

Apothecary: 

  • An historical name for a medical professional who formulates and dispenses ‘materia medica’.
  • A person who dispensed medicines derived from herbs, plants and roots.
  • One who practices herbalism and sometimes alchemy as well; Ancient word for “pharmacist”.

In our Family Apothecary Action Pack Magazine you’ll find:

[all using herbs and commonly found simple ingredients like beeswax, olive oil and bicarb soda (plus a few special products too -- like coconut oil and kaolin clay).]

  • Home herbal medicinal recipes (salves and cold remedies)
  • Eco-home cleaning and freshening ideas (natural cleaning products and washing recipes)
  • Eco beauty treatments (lip balms, creams and hair tonics)
  • Natural personal products (toothpaste and deodorant)

This is an e-magazine – you will receive a download link to a high quality printable pdf [which can also be viewed on a Tablet or iPad].

As well as detailed step-by-step how-to’s you’ll also find a slew of additional tips, ideas and alternative recipes for making some wonderful natural body, home and medicinal products for the whole family — all are easy enough for older kids to try but I know YOU will want to get stuck into this too.

PLUS there are sewing projects – eye mask, sleeping pillow, heat pack and lavender sachets (and more) which are all very easy to make and include detailed instructions.

And there is MORE … Each chapter has fact sheets highlighting some of the products that are used throughout, as well as a printable herbal guide AND each chapter has a page of printable gift tags too!

This is an e-magazine – you will receive a download link to a high quality printable pdf [which can also be viewed on a Tablet or iPad].

Important: The pdf magazine will be automatically delivered via e-mail as soon as your payment is received. The e-mail you receive will include a link to download the file directly to your computer. Please note that the link will only allow you to access the file for a limited period (150 hours or 5 tries), so please make sure to download and save the file on your own computer as soon as you receive it. Lost files may be replaced for a period of 30 days following purchase.

{ 2 comments }

For more kids craft, creative ideas and activities go to the Action Pack website