Books

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Drawing Projects For Children by Paula Briggs.

Black Dog Publishing.

Reviewed by Julianne Negri

 

How would you like a drawing book that encourages risk taking in art? A book that emphasises process over product? A book that encourages experimentation within guidance? A book that is full of messy-get-your-hands-dirty drawing projects? In short, a book with smudgy fingerprints all over it? Well if these things tick your boxes like they tick mine, Paula Briggs’, Drawing Projects for Children published by Black Dog Publishing is the art book for you.

Paula Briggs has not only created a beautiful object with this book. She has created a welcome antidote to a world (wide web) full of outcome based children’s activities that seem to be all about the photo opportunity to display on whatever platform – blog/insta/facebook/twitter – a parent chooses. She says in the section aimed at the facilitator:

“For children to get the most out of drawing, they need to be encouraged to push beyond what they consider ‘safe’ (‘safe’ drawings are those in which we know what the outcome is going to be before we have even started making them) and to take risks. By doing so they will widen their concept of what drawing is and what they are capable of achieving.”

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This is very much a gorgeous(smudgy) hands on book, divided into two sections – warm up drawing exercises and more in depth projects. So the only real way to review this book was to try it out. First – rustle up some children (fortunately not a challenge for me). Here are two I prepared earlier. Pepper and Wanda are active creative 7-almost-8-year-olds.

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The book is firmly aimed at children but without any dumbing down of language or “fun speak” or the sort of cutesy Dr Suess sort of language you often find with this target audience. For example:

“All of the projects in this book also use a huge range of drawing materials from inks and watercolours to graphite and pastels. Remember, great drawing experiences are not always about the outcome, but often about the things you learn when you experiment. So get ready to try out some new techniques, and make some wonderful creations!”

This tone generates respect for the child artist, for the materials being used and for the activity being undertaken. I read sections aloud to the kids first and we discussed some of the concepts – risk taking, process, not worrying about “mistakes”, no rubbing out etc. These are hugely neglected concepts in the world of a 7-almost-8-year old’s art practice. They are at an age where they lose the earlier wildness of creativity and have been firmly indoctrinated into school ideas of right and wrong and drawing like the person next to you, with a seemingly strong preoccupation on getting eyes and noses especially “right”!

While Paula Briggs suggests this book is aimed to be used independently by children, I found it does benefit from focused facilitating. And for kids this age? Fairly strong facilitation is required. Fortunately I had a background in art and understood the materials and requirements of the tasks, but it is written with point by point instructions, a colour coded idea of levels of intensity and a material list like a recipe and is therefore very accessible. For preparation we made a trip to the local art shop with a list in hand – lots of newsprint paper, various pencils, charcoals and pastels and some ink – and we were ready.

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We began with some warm ups which were wonderfully fun and challenging. Just look at the concentration on these faces.

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This “continuous line drawing” warm up was a terrific way to display process over outcome. Pens, paper, still life and go. The kids had to look at the object and draw it while not lifting their pen from the page. They were happy to keep trying this for ages!

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Our second warm up was “backwards-forwards sketching”. This was a good way to focus on looking and observing while slowing down the hand and creating texture.

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My kids are very physical and these drawing ideas are also very physical – hand-eye coordination, large gestural mark making and sustained concentration. We interspersed the activities with kicking the footy in the back yard to freshen up.

We enjoyed perusing all the projects in the book and the kids have ear-marked many they want to try asap. But the obvious “project” to undertake right away was the “Autumn Floor Drawing”. We ran around the house and street collecting leaves, seed husks, plants and all things Autumnal.

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I found myself joining in and rediscovering the joys of charcoal and of delicate lines and shading in a way I hadn’t indulged in years. It was so relaxing, for me and for the kids, to play with the materials without any pressure on the result.

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Drawing Projects For Children, while not completely independently accessible to younger children, actually benefits from involving a facilitator as well as the child. I found that Paula Briggs language and ideas generate an inspirational and stimulating practical art experience. Through warm ups and projects she extends children’s idea of mark making and drawing into a new realm. It challenges children (and teachers and parents) to explore, take artistic risks and to discover the fun inherent in drawing when there is no pressure for the outcome. It is a book we will return to and from just one day of experimenting it has already inspired these two kids to observe things a little differently and to think more about how to represent their world through art.

Drawing Projects for Children is highly recommended for those who love messy art. For those who want to encourage careful observation, thoughtful mark making and inspire artistic processes. For those who understand that experimentation and sustained exploration of a medium is more important than a quick simple art activity that results in a picture perfect photo opportunity. Go get the book, some supplies, some kids and get your fingers dirty.

 

 

 

 

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For more kids craft, creative ideas and activities go to the Action Pack website

We are continuing to celebrate alongside the Stash Books Legacy Blog Tour for Brave New Quilts by Whipup founder Kathreen Ricketson.

Today’s post is by Sonya Philip, who writes about her connection with Kathreen and her work and thoughts.

We are left with traces in paper and online. The world is richer for having Kathreen in it. She spoke her creativity. We were lucky to listen.

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We will be following each post on the Legacy Tour as some of Kathreen’s friends and admirers share their thoughts over the next couple of weeks.

Tuesday 10/8 : Ellen Luckett Baker
Wednesday 10/9 : Andrea Jenkins
Thursday 10/10 : Shannon Cook
Friday 10/11 : Mimi Kirchner
Monday 10/14 : Cheryl Arkison

Whipup is also proud to be featuring some guest posts from crafters who knew and admired the work of Kathreen.

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You can keep track of the Legacy Tour by following the hashtag #LegacyTour on social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

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We are continuing to celebrate alongside the Stash Books Legacy Blog Tour for Brave New Quilts by Whipup founder Kathreen Ricketson.

The tour post for today is by Alexandra Smith of  Lola Nova.  She writes about the book, and about the support and friendship she shared with Kathreen.

Kathreen’s legacy is huge and far reaching. From my first introduction to her via her trailblazing website WhipUp, to her brilliant kid’s magazine ActionPack, through her books and all of her endeavors; I have admired her talent, her love for her family, her intelligence and her amazingly generous spirit. She encouraged me greatly when I was working on my own book. She treated me with great respect and made me laugh. She is one of the people through whom I have made friends from all over the art/crafting/making community and have been more inspired and courageous than I ever could have imagined.

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We will be following each post on the Legacy Tour as some of Kathreen’s friends and admirers share their thoughts over the next couple of weeks.

Monday 10/7 : Sonya Philip
Tuesday 10/8 : Ellen Luckett Baker
Wednesday 10/9 : Andrea Jenkins
Thursday 10/10 : Shannon Cook
Friday 10/11 : Mimi Kirchner
Monday 10/14 : Cheryl Arkison

Whipup is also proud to be featuring some guest posts from crafters who knew and admired the work of Kathreen.

You can keep track of the Legacy Tour by following the hashtag #LegacyTour on social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

BNQcover

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We are continuing to follow the Stash Books Legacy Blog Tour for Brave New Quilts by Whipup founder Kathreen Ricketson.

Today’s post by Maya Donenfeld of maya*made is an exploration of Brave New Quilts, and a reflection on the kindness, creativity, generosity and spirit of Kathreen.

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We will be following each post on the Legacy Tour as some of Kathreen’s friends and admirers share their thoughts over the next couple of weeks.

Friday 10/4 :: Alexandra Smith
Monday 10/7 : Sonya Philip
Tuesday 10/8 : Ellen Luckett Baker
Wednesday 10/9 : Andrea Jenkins
Thursday 10/10 : Shannon Cook
Friday 10/11 : Mimi Kirchner
Monday 10/14 : Cheryl Arkison

Whipup is also proud to be featuring some guest posts from crafters who knew and admired the work of Kathreen.

You can keep track of the Legacy Tour by following the hashtag #LegacyTour on social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

BNQcover

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We are continuing to follow the Stash Books Legacy Blog Tour for Brave New Quilts by Whipup founder Kathreen Ricketson.

Today’s post is by Kristin Link of Sew Mama Sew, entitled Kathreen Ricketson’s Brave New Quilts Legacy Tour (or Why I spent an Entire Day Looking at Bauhaus Art)

Although Kathreen’s book doesn’t contain examples of the art of each period, in homage to the spirit of  Brave New Quilts, I thought I’d do a little research and share some inspiring art from just one of the 12 movements that are discussed in the book–Bauhaus. I hope that by reviewing this work, you’ll recognize the influence this art movement–from nearly a century ago –has had on the modern quilts of today, and perhaps be moved to make an art-inspired quilt of your own. (The quilt on the cover of the book, Weave, is Kathreen’s take on Bauhaus, and happens to be one of my favorites.)

We will be following each post on the Legacy Tour as some of Kathreen’s friends and admirers share their thoughts over the next couple of weeks.
Thursday 10/3 :: Maya Donenfeld
Friday 10/4 :: Alexandra Smith
Monday 10/7 : Sonya Philip
Tuesday 10/8 : Ellen Luckett Baker
Wednesday 10/9 : Andrea Jenkins
Thursday 10/10 : Shannon Cook
Friday 10/11 : Mimi Kirchner
Monday 10/14 : Cheryl Arkison

Whipup is also proud to be featuring some guest posts from crafters who knew and admired the work of Kathreen.

You can keep track of the Legacy Tour by following the hashtag #LegacyTour on social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

BNQcover

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