Whip Up Tutorials

Toy tutorials

by KateG on August 28, 2013

in Toys+Plush, Whip Up Tutorials

Hobby Horse        9. ladybug

Picture-18       bottles1forweb

There are so many fun tutorials on Whipup, I can hardly keep track of them all.  Here are a few fun soft toy tutorials that you might have missed.

Hobby horse by Abby Glassenberg

Ladybug by Lisa Ramsay Whitesell

Felt mouse puppet by Delia

Felted milk and juice bottles for pretend play by Katie Startzman

 

 

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During most of 2013, Whipup.net will hosting a monthly mini-series, each month edited by different crafters and designers. Enjoy!

The theme for this month is Make It Local :: with Alexandra Smith of Lola Nova.

bags

Inspired by my last post about the Farmer’s Market, I decided to whip up a simple tutorial for a handmade market bag called “The Origami Market Bag”. The name is taken from its unique folding technique. It makes up in a flash and is nice and roomy for all of your market treasure.

You will need fabric, thread, scissors and a sewing machine.

For the fabric, I suggest something a little heavier such as: canvas, linen, denim, or home décor type weight.

We start off with a piece of fabric whose length is 3 times the width. I found using a piece that is 17” X 51” (43cm X 130cm) makes a good size bag; you can play around with sizes if you like.

Once you have cut your piece of fabric to size, hem all of the raw edges.

(In the following photos I’ve used a smaller piece of unfinished fabric just to show the folding technique)

Start by laying your fabric with your hems facing away from you and follow the folding technique as shown below.

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Now pin and stitch as shown for both sides of the bag. I used about a 1cm seam allowance.

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It is ok if your bag is a little off center, this may happen if your hems are not perfectly even to one another.

Now that you have sewn your 2 seams, you can leave the bag as is for a nice triangle shape, or you can create some shape by sewing boxed corners, or simple angled corners. Now turn your bag right side out and press if needed.

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The next step is to create the handle for your bag. I used some coordinating fabric for a handle.

Cut a piece of fabric that is 3.5” X 6.5” (aprox. 9cm X 16.5cm) turn under and hem the 2 short sides of this piece. Fold the piece in half length-wise with right sides together and stitch raw edges with a ¼” (just under 1cm) seam allowance and turn right side out creating a tube.

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Take one of the long top triangles of your bag and thread it through the tube of fabric as shown. Overlap the other top piece with the bit you have threaded through the tube and pin. Now stitch in place. Slide the tube over the stitched overlapped section and center it.

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Ta Da! You now have your very own Origami Market Bag!

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Go ahead and make a few more, you know you want to!

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Please note, this tutorial is intended for personal use only. Therefore, do not reproduce, sell or commercialize in any form. Thanks for understanding!

Edited to add: My version of this bag was originally based on a bag I received many, many years ago that was handmade by a family friend from the Philippines. That first bag was made from old cotton rice sacks (similar to vintage flour sacks) and the handles tied in a knot. Not long after receiving it, I made my own bag using a couple of bandannas sewn together. In the years since, I have seen many versions of this very simple bag. Many variations of it have shown up as craft trends come and go, then come around again. I have seen similar patterns in vintage craft books, Japanese craft pattern books and high end leather bags on the runway. I have even seen some in macramé!

I make no claim to have “invented” this style of bag; its origins are ageless and elusive. I did sort out just how to make it on my own and put my own spin on it. The only bags I have sold from this tutorial were the prototypes pictured here, after materials cost, 100% of the profit from them goes directly to the fund for the Shugg children. I have no intention to sell any more of these bags.

Thank you,

Alexandra Smith

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Lark Craft’s upcoming book Heart-Felt Holidays: 40 Festive Felt Projects to Celebrate the Seasons is the follow-up to Fa La La La Felt. The book comes out in April, but Lark Crafts are starting the fun early by offering this Mushroom love brooch project by Lisa Jordan.

Mushroom love brooch project by Lisa Jordan

What You Need

  • Templates – see image below
  • Basic sewing supplies (needle, thread, thimble etc)
  • Turquoise, white, yellow, and red felted garment wool or wool felt, Plus dark gray felt (optional, see Tip)
  • White, red, turquoise, and yellow embroidery floss
  • Pin/brooch back
  • Fabric glue (optional)

What you need to do:

  • ONE: Using the templates provided, cut one small heart from the turquoise felt, one medium heart from the white felt, and one large heart from the yellow felt. Cut an additional large heart from the dark gray felt, and set aside. Use the templates to cut the two small half-circles from the red felt for the mushroom caps and the V shape from the white felt for the mushroom stems.
  • Tip: To simplify, cut the second large heart shape, which will be the brooch back, from the yellow felt instead of dark gray.
  • TWO: Using the photo for reference, position the mushroom stems on the turquoise heart, and whipstitch them in place with a single strand of the white floss. Add a few small running stitches down the center of the V to help define the two stems. Use one strand of the red floss to whipstitch a red mushroom cap on top of each stem.
  • THREE: Thread your needle with two strands of white embroidery floss and add a few decorative French knots to the mushroom caps.
  • FOUR: Stack the turquoise heart on top of the white heart, and stitch them together using the whipstitch and three strands of the turquoise floss. Then stitch this stack of hearts onto the large yellow heart, using three strands of red floss and the running stitch. Set aside.
  • FIVE: Sew a pin back to the felt backing piece. (If you like, you can cover the base of the pin back with a small felt heart.) Then position the heart stack on the backing, tacking it in place with the fabric glue if desired. Begin sewing the stack to the backing using a blanket stitch and three strands of the yellow embroidery floss. Stitch around the entire piece, hiding the knot beneath the stitches.

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Button-up Cup Cosy

This cute and cheerful cup cosy would make a great gift, or else you might like to make a few to brighten up your tea set for when guests visit.

Materials

  • 2x Scrap of fabric approx 30 x 15 cm / 12 6 inches
  • Small piece of thin elastic (an elastic hair band will be perfect)
  • Button
  • Needle and thread
  • Pen and paper

Step 1. Make your pattern 

  • - Grab your favourite mug or cup and lay it down on your piece of paper, resting it against the handle. While rolling the cup from end to the other, trace the base and then the top of your mug. Draw a joining line at the ends. After you have cut out the pattern, check it is symmetrical. Do this for each of the cups you wish to make a cosy for.

 Step 2: Sew together

  • - Place your 2 pieces of fabric right sides together and then pin your pattern on top of your double layer of fabric, and cut it out exactly without adding any seam allowance. Then sew around three of the outside edges, leaving one short end open.

Step 3: Add the tie & button

  • - Turn the sewn piece right side out, and press flat. Press the seam allowances on the open end under. Then take your piece of elastic and fold it in half and pin it inside this open edge. Then sew this edge closed, enclosing the elastic, sew over the elastic a couple of times to strengthen it. Sew a top stitch around the perimeter.
  • - Sew a bright button on the opposite side of the cup cosy piece and you are done!

 

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Katie grew up in Ohio and now lives in Boston, so she knows the value of a good double-layer mitten. She has been known to draw diagrams to illustrate her point. To read more about her creations, visit her blog: Foxflat

How to make Convection Mittens

Convection Mittens are serious handwarmers for serious wind and cold! They’re for when whimsical winter accessories just don’t cut it, and for all the times your hands can’t be shoved into coat pockets (carrying grocery bags home, pulling a sled, holding a dog leash).

When I saw how much fleece-lined wool mittens cost in stores, I tinkered with a pattern that could be made quickly and cheaply. Convection Mittens are sewn from felted wool with a fleece lining. They can be made in a couple of hours using repurposed thrifted clothing, and the pattern can be enlarged or shrunk on a copier to fit your whole family’s hands. Give them a try – I’d love to see how they turn out!

Pattern: 
DOWNLOAD PDF: includes illustrated instructions and a printable pattern for making your own pair of Convection Mittens.

Materials: 
Sewing machine, shears, needle, thread :: 1/2 yard (metre) each of felted wool and thin polyester fleece

Notes:
Felted wool and polyester fleece can both be purchased new, but they’re easy to find at a thriftstore. For the fleece, pick out a thinner weight pullover or a pair of pajama pants. Black fleece is always classy for adults, but for kids you could pick out something in a fun color or pattern.

For the felted wool, find a lightweight, 100% wool sweater with a care tag that says “dry clean only”. It’s going to thicken significantly when it shrinks, so it’s important to start with something lightweight or the felted version won’t be pliable enough to go through your sewing machine. I chose a tweedy solid, but you could also pick out a fun pattern like snowflakes or fair isle. Felt the sweater at home in your washing machine. If you haven’t felted a sweater on purpose before, The Magic Onions has a nice photo tutorial. The one thing I would add is that I always shave the final product with a disposable razor to remove extra fuzz.

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