Whip Up Tutorials


How to make a sleep mask

Materials

  1. 2 x small scraps of fabric 27 x 12 cm / 11 x 5 inches
  2. 1 x piece of cotton batting 27 x 12 cm / 11 x 5 inches
  3. Piece of thin elastic 25 cm / 10 inches long

Tools

  1. Sewing machine
  2. Scissors
  3. Paper
  4. Pins
  5. Needle and thread
  6. Iron

Step 1: Make a template from paper in an oval shape with one straight edge – like the one pictured top left, 13cm long x 10cm wide. Fold your two pieces of fabric in half length-ways and place the straight edge of your template against the folded edge of your fabric, trace around it and cut out. Do the same for your batting.

Step 2: Once you have cut out your fabric and batting you can embellish the front piece. Sew on fake eyes with scraps of felt, attach a ribbon, or stamp or embroider a message like ‘do not disturb’. Then sew each end of the elastic onto the right side of each end of your front fabric piece.

Step 3: Layer your 3 pieces, place the piece with the elastic attached face up on your bench, the back piece facing down over this and the batting on the top, pin these pieces together. As the elastic is slightly shorter than the length of your fabric, this may scrunch up, just do your best to pin it evenly around. Then sew all around the outside perimeter, leaving a 5cm gap un-stitched. Trim your seams to 1cm wide.

Step 4: Turn your sleep mask right side out through the gap you left and press it flat, be careful not to iron over the elastic. Use your needle and thread to hand sew the gap closed. You are done. Now go and make a few more, they make terrific last minute gifts.

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Laura Nelkin is a knitwear and jewelry designer who just finished an e-book of knitted jewelry designs called Adorn. Laura is a compulsive knitter who made her passion her career… and is loving every minute of it. Follow Laura and her exploits on her blog, on twitter and in her Ravelry group.

Eye-Glass Cord by Laura Nelkin

Need a last minute gifting idea? This easy eye glass cord is sure to be appreciated… video tutorials are included for the tricksy beading steps so anyone who knows how to knit can tackle this project and get it done in a night!

Materials

  • Approx. 20 yards of fingering weight yarn
  • Two Size 1 (2.25mm) double-pointed needles or size needed to obtain gauge
  • Approx. 6 grams of Size 8 glass seed beads
  • Dental Floss Threader
  • Tapestry needle
  • Eyeglass Grips (I got mine here)

Notes:

  • Finished length: 27 inches (69 cm) long
  • Skill Level: Easy
  • If you want to lengthen or shorten your bracelet or necklace it is easy! There are approx 9 beads used per inch of i-cord, (3 reps of stitch pattern.) So, if you want your finished piece an inch longer add 9 beads, or if you want it shorter, subtract 9 beads.

Set Up:
Thread 225 beads onto yarn with dental floss threader.
(Wondering how to thread on the beads? There is a great video tutorial here)
Cast on 3 sts as follows:
Hold yarn ready to work a long tail cast on with at least a 8” tail.
*With rh needle or a crochet hook reach through center of one eyeglass grip grab long end of yarn and pull through, then cast on one st with long tail cast on (2 sts on rh ndl), lift first st over second st; rpt from * two more times. [3 sts on ndl]

Slide sts to other end of ndl.
You will now be working beaded I-cord on these 3 sts as follows:
K1, k1 w/ bead, k1. Slide sts to other end of ndl.
K1 w/ bead, k2. Slide sts to other end of ndl.
K2, k1 w/ bead. Slide sts to other end of ndl.

Rep these 3 rows until all beads have been used.
(Need help with this beaded I-cord? There is a video tutorial here)
Knit one row.

Bind off as follows:
K1, then pull yarn through loop on second eyeglass grip and place onto rh ndl.
Take first st on rh ndl and slip over the second st. [1 st on rh ndl]
Bind off 1 st.
Pull yarn through loop on eyeglass grip again and place onto rh ndl.
Take first st on rh ndl and slip over the second st. [1 st on rh ndl]
Bind off last st.
Cut yarn leaving a 6 inch tail, pull end through last stitch. Weave in ends. Block if desired.

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Cate Anevski is an artist, illustrator, and all-around maker living in less-than-sunny Portland, OR, who recently took up the task of converting the rest of the world into crafters, one tutorial at a time. Constantly working and creating, Cate shares her work at her blog and in her Etsy shop, and she provides tutorials, patterns and other general nonsense in a side project, Bee’s Knees Activities.
Felt House Ornament
When family lives far away, it can be hard to feel truly at home during the holidays. This little handmade ornament can help bring a little slice of home to you, wherever you may roam.
Materials:
  • Felt in 3 different colors
  • Embroidery floss in 3 different colors
  • Stuffing
  • Tools:
  • Needle
  • Water soluble marker (optional)
  • Pattern pieces PDF here
Instructions:
  • Step 1. Cut out pattern pieces from felt.
  • Step 2. Pin roof piece to house piece with a 1/2″ overlap. Stitch in place with 3 strands of embroidery floss using the running stitch following the scallop shape of the roof. Repeat for both roof and house pieces.
  • Step 3. Sew door to front of house with three strands of embroidery floss using blanket stitch.
  • Step 4. Embroider window details on front of house with two strands of embroidery floss using the backstitch. You can draw guidelines on the felt with a water soluble marker, or you can freehand the lines.
  • Step 5. Sew front and back house pieces wrong sides together with three strands of embroidery floss using blanket stitch. Leave an opening of about 2″ with a long tail of thread to sew it shut.
  • Step 6. Stuff your ornament as much or as little as you like. Stitch shut the opening you left in the last step using the long tail of thread.
  • Step 7. Thread a 4″ piece of embroidery floss through the point of the roof and tie in a knot.

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Chris is a web designer and stay at home Dad of two preschool children. He is the publisher of Themeaparty.com, a site filled with birthday party and entertaining tips, including craft activities for children. Chris lives in the middle of the Prairies in Winnipeg, Canada, and no, he doesn’t play hockey. However, he loves his Tim Horton’s coffee and can whip up a fun party with some string, two paper clips, some stickers and a slice of pizza!

These snowflake patterns would be great to use on lots of different sorts of projects too…

Felt Christmas Stocking Tutorial

Hello, everybody. I’m just getting into fabric crafts, mainly because my eldest daughter, who is in kindergarten, brought home a cute felt candy cane she had made at her winter wonderland party, and asked if we could make something else. As we had just put up the Christmas tree, my wife and I thought of creating something special for the holidays that she can showcase. Christmas Stockings! After all, they delight kids of all ages with the surprises they hold inside.

This craft is certain to please, even before it’s filled with Christmas goodies. Though it’ll be too advanced for younger children (such as ours), we let her trace the stocking and the snowflake tracings. For her own stocking, we let her doodle on the fabric with glitter glue before sewing it together.

Materials:

  • Red felt (12″ X 16″)
  • Green felt, or other contrasting color (12″ X 3″)
  • Pins
  • Scissors
  • Carbon paper
  • Thread
  • Needle
  • Seed beads and bugle beads (white, silver, gold)
  • 12″ piece of ribbon

Two templates to download and print:

Instructions:

  1. Print out the template for the stocking and cut around the lines. You will have two pieces: the main part of the stocking and the top brim.
  2. Pin the pieces of paper onto a double layer of felt (use the red felt for the main part and the green felt for the brim).
  3. With sharp scissors, cut around the paper template. You will have two red stockings and two green brims.
  4. Print out the snowflake patterns and choose which ones you wish to embroider on your stocking. You can choose to make just one snowflake, or you can change the size of your snowflakes.
  5. Using carbon paper, trace the snowflakes onto the felt.
  6. Secure the thread on the reverse side of the felt. Bring the needle to the front, and thread the number of beads you need, to create each small line of your snowflake. Bring the needle to the back and then, bring it back to the front at the point where your next small line is. Continue this way until you have decorated your Christmas Stocking.
  7. Glue the green brim to the red stocking (both front and back).
  8. If you intend to fill your stocking, then it is best to sew the two pieces together either by hand or using a sewing machine. If you plan to use it just to decorate, you can just glue the front and back together around the edges.
  9. Make a loop with the ribbon and attach it to the top of the stocking where you wish to hang it from.

You’re done! Our daughter decorated a bunch of them her own 5-year old way, so we’re thinking of making several of these in minature as a cute garland for our fireplace.

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Lisa Ramsey Whitesell enjoys being a stay at home mom of 2 girls. Vegetarian cooking, sewing, gardening, and living the “natural way” is her bliss. She shares her lifestyle at her blog and runs an Etsy business where she makes plush and pillows.
materials:
 
steps:
  • 1. Cut out pieces from pattern.
  • 2. Whip stitch the body pieces together.
  • 3. Leave a space open to stuff the ladybug; stuff, then whipstitch closed.
  • 4. Stitch the spots onto the red wings.
  • 5. Whipstitch the wings to the ladybug.
  • 6. Stitch on the antennae.
  • 7. Sew black pupils onto the eyes by using a running stitch. Add a little white “x” for a little sparkle in the eye. You can add a wink to one of the eyes by using a backstitch.
  • 8. Stitch eyes onto the ladybug.

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