eco

TASSEL trashy glittery Dec2014

I’ve been looking at a LOT of Pinterest images in the last few days – there are some very pretty things out there!

Specifically I’ve been hunting for things to hang around the house instead of on a Christmas tree since we probably won’t have a live one this year.

I LOVE the smell of pine trees – it reminds me of childhood Christmases and really brings the season into the house like nothing else. I might put a few sprigs around to do the job, but our house is way too crowded with stuff to manage an actual tree. In fact, I’m not sure we have wall space enough to trace a tree on the wall or hang anything at all. Really, I should declutter. After Christmas maybe…

Christmas tree 2008- Jane Schouten - atlitwIngrid Jansen tree 2012 via atlitw

I’ve seen some wonderful alternatives to Christmas trees. The two above come via the photostream of Jane Schouten (of All the Luck In the World). Thanks Jane for letting me share these images!

The first was made by Jane in 2008, a tree-shaped hanging of  (useless but pretty) objects  to use Jane’s description.

I certainly have a lot of useless but pretty, even useless and quirky, or weird, or where-did-this-come-from objects collected over the years. If I had enough wall space I could have a pretty fabulous tree and feel vindicated for collecting (um hoarding) them all this time.

The second tree, made from salvaged recycled timber is by Ingrid Jansen of woodwoolstool. This particular one was made in 2012, but Ingrid has some similar assemblages in different colour themes available from her Etsy shop – along with some other gorgeous things to drool over…

There are hundreds of non-traditional Christmas trees out there in Pinterest, Instagram and Flickr, but I haven’t yet found my tree – the one that’s taking shape in the back of my mind…

In the meantime I am busying myself with making the ornaments and hanging thingies that will eventually be my tree. One such hanging thingie – a tassel really – is featured at the top of the page. It’s made from that shiny plasticized packaging that crackers and biscuits, crisps and chips come in. That stuff is FABULOUS to make sparkly glittery things from. I tried to describe my process over on my occasional blog habertrashery, but I’m not sure I was very clear. So I’m posting here as well with a few pics:

  1. Get your shiny plastic packaging, open it up and cut the stiff seams off – these can be used for making another hanging thing later.
    Christmas2014-bag seam hangy 1 low res
  2. Roll up your piece of packaging longways and then snip it up into strips – about half a centimetre or quarter of an inch wide.Trashy glittery tassel - cutting Making2-Dec2014 copy
  3. Unfold the strips and lay them together in parallel. Using some thread – sparkly is always good – tie the strips securely together about half way along the bunch. Looks like a big glitzy spider or a scrappy bow tie.Making-3 -trashy glittery tassel Dec2014 copy
  4. Fold all the strips down so they are hanging down vertically and use some more thread to tie them together near the first knot – the top of the tassel. Now it looks like a proper tassel – or a shiny person in a big sparkly dress. I’m now finished – TA DA – but you could add some wings by using a wide ribbon instead of thread for that last knot and make an angel.TASSEL trashy glittery Dec2014
  5. With the leftover stiff seams of the packaging I tied bows together for another hanging thing. Trashy glittery hangy thing Dec2014
  6. And finally all those left over scraps of packaging and sparkly thread was cut up into DIY glitter for future emergency glitter projects!  Trashy glitter Dec2014 low res

That was a lot of fun to do – but I have a lot more hanging stuff to make before I have my tree finished.

Back soon!

 

 

 

{ 2 comments }

Guest series 2012: I asked fellow bloggers, makers and creators to write on their creativity and focus their essay on one of four topics: creativity and health, creativity and business, creativity and parenting or creativity and process. I am very excited to have a wonderful lot of fellow creative folk guest posting here at whipup.net over the next couple of months. Please welcome…

Lara Cameron is a Melbourne based textile designer and co-owner of Ink & Spindle, a boutique, organic and sustainable yardage screen printing studio located in Melbourne. Lara blogs at kirinote.

It would be so easy for me to write a post about how to turn your hobby or passion into a business. It’s a topic I know about all too well, since textile design was one of those things I dabbled with on the side before Teegs and I launched Ink & Spindle, our small, textile design and screen printing business. But I think there’s enough posts out there already explaining the value of business plans, pricing, blogging and good photography (although if you want to know about pricing check out the blog post I wrote on the topic over here!).

Instead I thought it would be nice to write about how my craft – and running Ink & Spindle – has improved my health and outlook on life. Because over the years it’s becoming more and more apparent to me how much the way I view the world has changed during the time we’ve owned this business.

I guess fundamental to this shift in thinking is the fact that running a small business doesn’t provide much in terms of financial reward. It’s not a bad thing, it’s just a fact. If you want to produce goods in an ethical, sustainable manner, without cutting corners or working crazy hours, you’ll never make as much money as those people whose businesses function within (and depend upon) the fundamentally flawed construct of the capitalist world. You pay first world rent, pay first world wages, work first world hours (mostly). Naturally profit margins are much lower, but that’s inherent in any ethical business and I feel like it’s the only way I’d ever like to earn money.

So if you’re not doing it for financial reward, why are you doing it? Because there are other rewards in the world that are more valuable than money, such as going to work each day and feeling good about what you are doing. It feels like such a privilege to do something each day that I enjoy, to work with my hands, be creative, be surrounded by good people and ultimately have full control over my own direction. It’s also highly rewarding to feel like you’re making some small positive contribution to the world. We may be nothing more than a drop in the ocean of the world of textiles, but it’s great to be providing people with an ethical alternative, and proving to our peers that it is possible to make a living doing something you love.

In a way I’ve found my very modest wage to be quite liberating. Before Ink & Spindle I worked as a web and graphic designer. My wage was still modest but fairly consistent, and I started to entertain the notion that I could buy some property. Buying a house is something I’ve always wanted to do since I was quite young, and I still love the idea of it. But living in Melbourne where property prices are through the roof respective to average incomes, buying a home anywhere close to the city is something that’s just not an option to a lot of people in my generation.

But strangely, now that that option has been taken away from me, I actually feel quite free. Thinking about buying a house and feeling like I needed to save a lot and start looking ASAP was always a background stress in my life, a constant pressure. Now that I’ve let that go I feel like my eyes have been opened to other ways of thinking about life and what my priorities are. I also feel as though it’s okay for me to live more in the moment. I don’t need to be constantly saving or chasing higher incomes just so that I can save for a deposit or pay off a bit more of a mortgage. I can live a bit more for the “now”. I can focus on those things that make my day to day life enjoyable – friends, family, making things – and what’s more important than being happy, right now?

I think this is a good moment to quote a bit of the wise ‘ol Dalai Lama: The Dalai Lama, when asked what surprised him most about humanity, he said:

 

Man.
Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money.
Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health.
And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present;
the result being that he does not live in the present or the future;
he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.

I guess it’s easy for me to spout these ideals whilst I am currently unattached and childless, but I hope that in my future – when I do have a family – I will be able to live by similar values. I’d like to live simply. I’d like to extend the ethical practices of my business into more facets of my life. I’d like to have chooks and a vegie garden and maybe one day build a self sufficient home outside of town.

I guess to put it simply, my small creative business has educated and allowed me to step outside of the rat race, view it from a slightly more objective standpoint. I am happier and healthier now that I stand free of those pressures, and am glad to be able to put my time and energy into building a business that makes myself and others happy and is hopefully benefiting the world in some small way :)

{ 14 comments }

  1. Making this gnome bowling set from recycled soda bottles looks like a fun thing for the grownups and kids to make and play with together.
  2. Make this boats from corks – great all day activity for all ages (via).
  3. Weave a mat using t-shirts also (via) great project for school age kids and I am thinking grownups too will dig this.
  4. Braided headbands using fabric scraps - perfect for all ages.
  5. Printed wall hanging - using cereal boxes and found materials

{ 5 comments }

For more kids craft, creative ideas and activities go to the Action Pack website

I am so happy to welcome to Whipup, Cheri from I Am Momma Hear Me Roar.

Over at my blog I love to sew, paint, organize, photograph, decorate, and upcycle. I especially love boy projects because I have two little guys, but I also enjoy making something for myself here and there.

I have a simple tutorial to help you turn broken jewelry into a new hip jewelry. I had a necklace that had three strands with some orange beads on it and it broke. It was cheap to begin with, so I wasn’t surprised, but I couldn’t part with it. So, I turned it into this.

Here’s what I did. I cut strips of fabric and washed them so they would fray a bit. (I used some creme-colored canvas I had lying around.) I had to trim the frayed strips up a bit afterwards, but the dryer helped give them that frayed edge I wanted. (Tip: I like to wash my fabric strips in a laundry bag so I don’t have to sort through the whole load of laundry to find them and so they don’t get tangled with the other laundry.)

I took my broken necklace and cut it into three separated strands.

I glued the three strips of fabric together at the top, set a chain on top of each strand, and then I braided them together as shown.

The beads pop out here and there giving the necklace a fun pop of color. When the necklace seemed to be the right length I cut the strips and hot glued them together at the end. I cut off any stray strings of fray that had come out.

Lastly I glued a long narrow strip to each end so the necklace could be tied on. I love the idea of mixing different metals and fabrics to create unique jewelry.

And there you have it. Thanks for having me Kathreen. All of you are welcome at my place anytime. -Cheri

{ 14 comments }

September/October brings change of season, and fresh starts and frivolity and seriousness too. So for a break from whipup realtime I am introducing a few weeks of guest bloggers to liven up your crafty experience. To bring you something fresh, and hopefully invigorate you to make and do and be and think! Its going to be a fun few weeks so come along for the ride.

Today I want to welcome Ashley English to Whipup. I am a huge fan of Ashley and her books (which I reviewed over here) this is a woman after my own heart, Ashley lives on her plot of land in a small mountain community, where she lives and writes about sustainable food practices, and how to reconnect with food. I loved her books and really look forward to more. In the mean time you can check out her blog and her regular Design*Sponge column – Small Measures.

I don’t know where you hang your hat, but around my neck of the woods, the weather took a much welcome turn this week. Mornings that were previously hot, heavy, muggy, and not particularly welcome by anyone in my un-air conditioned 1930′s home are now cool, crisp, and beloved. I’m making simmering pots of slow-cooked steel cut oats for breakfast now and resting my hands lingeringly around mugs of steaming, fragrant tea. I’ve begun busting out my hoodies and cardigans and have even found the need, not witnessed in months, for socks, not to mention closed-toe shoes! I’ve even started hunting for fleece sock liners for my Wellies and wool long johns for the Hubs. Firing up the wood stove before too terribly long is also definitely now on the horizon.

Parallel with this resplendent weather, though, comes a drastic reduction in humidity. Subsequently, my skin, all dewiness and moisture during the haze of summer, can be rendered into a leathery mess unless I stage a quick “skintervention.” Unless I step in and step up the moisture, things can get ugly, fast. Always looking for natural, DIY, thrifty means of managing my skin care needs, come autumn, I turn to my old standby, tried and true-The Great Pumpkin Patch Face Mask.

It’s not everyday that just two ingredients can make you look radiant. Just two simple things alchemically interact, rendering your skin into absolute smooth, moist, plump perfection. Two things, pumpkin and yogurt, in combination, slathered onto your face and left to work their magic in minutes, can turn you from Leatherface to Cleopatra in half an hour. But don’t take my word for it-whip up this easy peasy concoction yourself, ready in minutes and, better still, available at a fraction of the cost of ready made goods.


The Great Pumpkin Patch Face Mask

The Goods:

  • 1/4 c. pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie mix!)
  • 2 Tbsp. plain whole milk yogurt (unflavored)
  • The Deal:

  • Place ingredients into a small bowl.
  • Whisk gently until completely combined.
  • Slather liberally on face and neck.
  • Leave for 15 minutes (I’d suggest using a head band to keep your hair off your face).
  • Rinse off with warm water.
  • { 9 comments }