fabric

We are continuing to celebrate alongside the Stash Books Legacy Blog Tour for Brave New Quilts by Whipup founder Kathreen Ricketson.

Today’s post is by Sonya Philip, who writes about her connection with Kathreen and her work and thoughts.

We are left with traces in paper and online. The world is richer for having Kathreen in it. She spoke her creativity. We were lucky to listen.

10122679516_f971df7814

We will be following each post on the Legacy Tour as some of Kathreen’s friends and admirers share their thoughts over the next couple of weeks.

Tuesday 10/8 : Ellen Luckett Baker
Wednesday 10/9 : Andrea Jenkins
Thursday 10/10 : Shannon Cook
Friday 10/11 : Mimi Kirchner
Monday 10/14 : Cheryl Arkison

Whipup is also proud to be featuring some guest posts from crafters who knew and admired the work of Kathreen.

BNQcover

You can keep track of the Legacy Tour by following the hashtag #LegacyTour on social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

{ 0 comments }

We are continuing to celebrate alongside the Stash Books Legacy Blog Tour for Brave New Quilts by Whipup founder Kathreen Ricketson.

The tour post for today is by Alexandra Smith of  Lola Nova.  She writes about the book, and about the support and friendship she shared with Kathreen.

Kathreen’s legacy is huge and far reaching. From my first introduction to her via her trailblazing website WhipUp, to her brilliant kid’s magazine ActionPack, through her books and all of her endeavors; I have admired her talent, her love for her family, her intelligence and her amazingly generous spirit. She encouraged me greatly when I was working on my own book. She treated me with great respect and made me laugh. She is one of the people through whom I have made friends from all over the art/crafting/making community and have been more inspired and courageous than I ever could have imagined.

10073515726_0f148a6231_z
We will be following each post on the Legacy Tour as some of Kathreen’s friends and admirers share their thoughts over the next couple of weeks.

Monday 10/7 : Sonya Philip
Tuesday 10/8 : Ellen Luckett Baker
Wednesday 10/9 : Andrea Jenkins
Thursday 10/10 : Shannon Cook
Friday 10/11 : Mimi Kirchner
Monday 10/14 : Cheryl Arkison

Whipup is also proud to be featuring some guest posts from crafters who knew and admired the work of Kathreen.

You can keep track of the Legacy Tour by following the hashtag #LegacyTour on social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

BNQcover

{ 0 comments }

Today is the start of the Stash Books Legacy Blog Tour for Brave New Quilts by Whipup founder Kathreen Ricketson.

The first post on the tour is at olive and ollie, with a heartfelt post by Heather Jones.

IMG_7144

We will be following each post on the Legacy Tour as some of Kathreen’s friends and admirers share their thoughts over the next couple of weeks.
Wednesday 10/1 :: Kristin Link
Thursday 10/3 :: Maya Donenfeld
Friday 10/4 :: Alexandra Smith
Monday 10/7 : Sonya Philip
Tuesday 10/8 : Ellen Luckett Baker
Wednesday 10/9 : Andrea Jenkins
Thursday 10/10 : Shannon Cook
Friday 10/11 : Mimi Kirchner
Monday 10/14 : Cheryl Arkison

Whipup is also proud to be featuring some guest posts from crafters who knew and admired the work of Kathreen.

You can keep track of the Legacy Tour by following the hashtag #LegacyTour on social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

BNQcover

{ 1 comment }

The reviewer of this book was Danielle: Danielle is a Canberra-based quilter, crafter, knitter and collector of fabric who loves to applique. She blogs infrequently at Petits Elefants, but is more likely to be found on Instagram and twitter (@petitselefants).

cover

Beginner’s Guide to Free-Motion Quilting  Natalia Bonner, Stash Books, 2012

 

Natalia Bonner is well-known in the online quilting community as a professional long-arm quilter. In her first book, she shows us how many of the popular quilting patterns used on modern quilts by long-arm quilters can be replicated on our home machines. This is a practical guide, with lots of pictures and diagrams to unravel the mystery of how those lovely, perfectly rounded and spaced swirls can work on your quilt!

fmqpg

There’s no denying that free-motion quilting is to many home quilters the last frontier. While we may have squeezed a twin-sized quilt under the tiny throat of our machines at times, sometimes we have to admit that sending the quilt off to be quilted on a long-arm machine is the better option. Others may be confident with a gentle meandering stipple pattern, but be a little nervous about trying something that looks a bit more complicated. This book will help dispel the perception that ‘fancy’ quilting patterns can’t be done on your home machine.

fmqpg2

In practical terms, it’s important to acknowledge that free-motion quilting, as with a lot of skills, takes practice, and lots of it. The more you practise, the better you will be. If you’re willing to put in that practice, then this book has loads of inspiration for quilting designs, ranging from simple swirls to more complex combined designs, and perhaps the pinnacle of quilting, the feather! One feature I particularly like about this book is the whole chapter it devotes to border designs, and especially the hints about carrying the design around corners, something I have struggled with in the past and which has put me off wanting to free-motion quilt on my quilts that have borders. There are also sections on allover designs, how to quilt custom designs to fit individual blocks and how to manage appliquéd quilts. Six quilt patterns are included in the book, my favourite of which is the cover quilt, Orange Slices.

This book will serve as a fabulous resource for anyone who either would like to try free-motion quilting or who has already mastered one or more designs. It is packed with detailed pictures and diagrams, and practical tips on how to complete your quilt.

{ 3 comments }

Throughout February I will be featuring quilts from my book Little Bits Quilting Bee (published by Chronicle late last year). Because designer fabric is often only in print for one season it can be difficult for quilt designers and authors to choose fabrics that will be still available when the book or pattern is published; so to help you out I will be offering advice and alternate fabric choices for many of the quilts in my book. You’ll also need a copy of my book to make the quilts – and they are available in all good book shops and online too.

What is pre-cut fabric?

Pre-cut fabrics are a series of co-ordinating fabrics — usually from a single collecton — especially cut and packaged by the manufacturer. Using these pre-cuts has a few benefits:

  • 1. You get a whole bunch of different fabrics at once – making it easy to build up your stash. You can use them together in one quilt or mix them with other fabrics from your stash too.
  • 2. Coordinating fabrics and colours for a quilt is easier.
  • 3. The packs are cut into handy pieces allowing you to whip up  a quilt very easily and quickly.

Do I need to pre-wash pre-cut fabric?

Pre-cut fabrics are a little difficult to pre-wash, because the pieces are so small they get tangled up in the wash and are time consuming to iron. I usually don’t worry about pre-washing my pre-cuts – however there are a couple of exceptions:

  • 1. You should pre-wash hand dyes and batiks as the colours are likely to run.
  • 2. You should pre-wash dark colours – especially red, purple and navy as these are more likely to run.
  • 3. You should pre-wash reds especially if you are using them with lighter colours.

If you didn’t pre-wash your fabric before making the quilt and you are worried the colours might run (especially if you have a white background) — all is not lost, there are a few things you can still do to ensure the colours in your quilt do not run the first time you wash:

  • 1. Wash your quilt in cold water on a gentle cycle and throw in some colour catchers to soak up any dye that might come out.
  • 2. Wash your quilt in cold water with vinegar – the vinegar will set any colours that are likely to run.
  • 3. Use a product such as synthrapol in the wash, this special detergent is used to remove unattached excess dye.

In my book Little Bits Quilting Bee, I use four different types of pre-cuts to create the 20 unique quilts: Fat Quarters, Charm Squares, Jelly Rolls and Layer Cakes.

Fat quarters:

Fat Quarters are the most widely available and used pre-cut fabric. A fat quarter is literally a 1/4 of a yard of fabric, but it is not cut selvedge to selvedge it is cut by cutting half a yard of fabric in half widthways. Fat quarters are generally 18 inches by 22 inches. Most fabric companies offer Fat Quarter bundles, which contain every print in a collection.

Charm Squares:

A charm square is a 5 x 5 inch square of fabric, and are great for easy patchwork quilts. Charm packs are made up of about 40 pieces of  5 inch squares and are equal to approx 3/4 of a yard of fabric.

Jelly Rolls:

Jelly Rolls are a Moda invention, but are available under other names from different fabric manufacturers: Bali pops, Design rolls, Strip-tease buns, Sushi Rolls, and Roll-ups are just some of the names these are sometimes called. They usually contain forty strips (well 40-44 strips — but check before buying how many are included as different manufacturers offer different amounts of strips) and are a standard 2 ½ inches wide. These are perfect for binding and sashing but are also great in any strip type quilt design.

Layer Cakes:

Layer cakes are 10 inch square packs of fabrics, containing usually 40 squares. The total fabric yardage is about 3 1/2 yards. Layer cakes are fun to use because they are so versatile, you can use them as they are and they make for a quick and easy quilt, but you can also cut them into squares and triangles or use them for applique too. Various fabric companies, as well as Moda, offer these 10 inch square packs under other names, but the amount of squares in a pack may vary.

All images are copyright John Paul Urizar who did a great job on the photography in the book. 

 

{ 4 comments }